More Info About Plagiarism: Using BG Content (CC and Fair Use)

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed by blastedgoat under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

Please leave a comment if you wish to borrow any material from this blog…

I am a college graduate with a BA in English. That doesn’t mean all the articles here are polished or professional so use your best judgement when referencing materials. I do my best to make sure I don’t publish things that do not belong to me without permission or citation. If this is not the case please let me know and I will determine if it is a case of fair use or if the content should be removed.

What can you find here at BLASTEDGOAT?

I’ve included everything from papers I wrote in college to photographs I snapped on a nature trail. You will also find: recipes, creative writing, poetry and the occasional incoherent rambling!

All it takes is a comment telling me what you want to use and how you are going to use it. If you are using my photo for a Powerpoint, great! If you want to borrow references or talk about my article in an informal class discussion, go right ahead! If you want to take what I’ve written and pretend it’s of your own creation, you can forget it!

You can get into academic trouble for directly stealing content from someone else and claiming it is your own. If you are unclear about what plagiarism is I would be glad to show you some resources that can help you use materials fairly.

If your quest is noble and your heart be true you may use words, photos, videos and drawings here on BG. I appreciate you taking the time to read this and look through the chapters and pages of my online portfolio.

I appreciate links back and am obliged to return the favor to those who use my work in articles, videos and other media formats. Look for a “collaborator links” section soon!

THANKS FROM BG

 

9 thoughts on “More Info About Plagiarism: Using BG Content (CC and Fair Use)

  1. Hello! I am a junior at Hamilton Heights High School and I just wanted to let you know that I was going to use your idea from “Hamlet, Tragedy, and Multiple Views of Madness” about how Hamlet is interest in madness as a mask. I completely agree with that and would like to use it. I’ll make sure to cite correctly! Thank you

    Like

  2. Hi there! I am a junior at Hamilton Heights High School and I just wanted to let you know that I was going to incorporate your idea from “Hamlet, Tragedy, and Multiple Views of Madness” (that no matter how crazy Hamlet’s ravings seem to the other characters, they make perfect sense in his mind) into my essay on Hamlet’s madness for AP Literature and Composition. I was going to quote the second part (just “make perfect sense in Hamlet’s mind) if that’s okay. I’ll make sure to cite properly! Thanks so much for writing that article!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi, I just thought I would respectfully inform you of my using your blog as a source from which I am writing a paper on the madness of Hamlet, for an Introductory English class at the Community College of San Francisco. I am not actually copying information in a copy paste sense, but rather linking the idea of religious influence that may have been a factor in the writing process of Shakespeare’s play, Hamlet. I am only just starting to learn how to properly write a college essay, so I hope I don’t butcher my interpretation when I put it on paper.

    Best Regards
    Anthony G.

    Like

  4. Hi! I’m currently a junior at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, VA and I was hoping to quote you from “Following Harvey Down the Rabbit-Hole”. I’m fulfilling my art performance credit by taking an acting class and our school recently performed Harvey and we’re required to write a critique. Towards the end I wanted to talk more about Harvey and the pooka so I was hoping to use this quote:

    “Selective of who they reveal themselves to, at times they are only visible to one person. Elwood explains Harvey’s eccentricity to Betty “If Harvey happens to take a liking to people he expresses himself quite definitely. If he’s not particularly interested, he sits there like an empty chair or an empty space on the floor.” Harvey not only appears to Elwood but also seems to play several pranks throughout the play. Pooka could be considered trickster figures, creatures that are often regarded as wise and helpful.”

    If you give permission, would you also mind providing me with a name so that I can properly cite it?
    I don’t know how wordpress works, but I don’t have an account so I’m not sure how to find out if you respond… Haha.
    Just in case my email is:
    kmccart2@mail.umw.edu

    Thank you! I really enjoyed the Harvey article.

    Like

Thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: